Salvation through a bad resource

Me and a colleague have been struggling for some time deploying an IIS website correctly using chef. As you may be aware, chef is used to describe the desired state of the configuration of a system through the use of resources, which know how to bring parts of the system into the desired state – if they, for some reason, should not be – during a process called convergence.

Chef has a daemon (or Service, as it is called in the civilised world) that continually ensures that the system is configured in accordance with the desired state. If the desired state changes, the system is brought into line automagically.

As usual, what works nicely and neatly in Unix-like operating systems requires volumes of eloquent code literature, or pulp fiction rather, to implement on Windows, because things are different here.

IIS websites are configured with a file called web.config. When this file changes, the website restarts (the application threadpool does, to be specific). Since the Chef windows service is running chef-client in regular intervals it is imperative that chef-client doesn’t falsely assume that the configuration needs to be overwritten  every time it runs is as that would be quite disruptive to any would-be users of the application. Now, the autostart behaviour can be disabled, but that is not the way things should have to be.

A common approach on Windows is to disable the chef service and to just run the chef client manually when you know you want to deploy things, but that just isn’t right either and it takes a lot away from the basic features and the profound magic of chef. Anyway, this means we can’t keep tricking chef into believing that things have changed when they really haven’t, because that is disruptive and bad.

So like I mentioned earlier – IIS websites are configured with a file called web.config. Since everybody that ever encountered an IIS website is aware of that, there is no chance that an evildoer won’t know to look for the connection strings to the database in that very file. To mitigate this well-knownness, or at least make the evil-doer first leverage a privilege escalation vulnerability,  there is a built-in feature that allows an administrator to encrypt the file so that the lowly peon account that the website is executing as doesn’t have the right to read it.  For obvious reasons this encryption is tied to the local machine, so you can’t just copy the file to a different machine where you happen to be admin to decrypt it. This does however mean that you have to first template the file to a temporary location and then check if the output of the chef template, the latest and greatest of website configuration, is actually any different from what was there before.

It took us ages to figure out that what we need to do is to write our web.config template exactly as it looks once it has been decrypted by Windows, then start our proceedings by decrypting the production web.config into a temporary location. We then set up the chef template resource to try and overwrite the temporary file with new values, and if there has been a change, use notifications to trigger a ruby_block that normally doesn’t execute, but when triggered by the template resource both encrypts the updated config and copies it across to prod.

Result!

But wait… The temporary file has to be deleted. It has highly sensitive information (I would like to flatter myself) and shouldn’t even have made it to disk in its clear-text form, and now it’s still there waiting to be read by the evildoer.

Using a ruby block resource or a file resource to delete the temporary file causes chef to record this as a change, and change that isn’t a change is bad. Or at least misleading in this case.

Enter colleague nr 2 “just make a bad resource that doesn’t use converge_by”.

Of course! We write a resource that takes a path and deletes it using pure ruby code, but it “forgets” to tell chef that a file was deleted, so chef will update the configuration when it should but will gladly report 0 resources updated at the end of a run where nothing has changed. Beautiful!

DONE. Week-end. I’m off.

 

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